Have you been playing the guitar for a while but not sure if you are improving?

Are you just starting out and what to know how to motivate yourself, even more, to improve faster?

Do you enjoy being competitive with yourself and think it would help encourage you to practise more on the guitar?

 

Being able to see, feel or hear yourself improving on the guitar is a great way to bench mark how you are getting on. Often people can get too focused on the small things with their guitar playing. And don’t realise that they are improving.

 

You may have your friends and families telling you that you are improving, but you just can’t tell. This article will give you a few ways to experience how your guitar playing progress is going.

 

Before we get started, it’s important to know that making progress isn’t always the most important thing about playing the guitar. You should be enjoying your guitar playing! However, most people do feel frustrated when they feel like they are not making progress. Especially when they have been playing for years on the guitar.

 

If you are getting the right training and the right instructions, along with practising properly. You should see really good progress in your guitar playing. Which will encourage you to practice more and improve even faster. Everyone progresses in their own rates, so just focus on what you’ve got to do to get to where you want to be.

 

Using the following ways, you can use them as methods to find out how much you are progressing. Some are more objective than other methods. But make sure whatever you are measuring, they are items that you are actively working on between each measure. Otherwise, you might not see much progress. (Though that might actually encourage you to practise your weak points more!)

 

Videoing yourself

Videoing yourself while playing the guitar is a great way to seeing how you are progressing on creative items on the guitar. This includes improvisation, or perhaps your phrasing. Such as how your vibratos or bends are sounding. You can even get those specific items recorded through an amp to hear how you sound as well. So that you can really tell the difference.

 

Do this around every three to six months to see big improvements in those areas. 

 

Videoing yourself, you can also see how “effortless” you look playing the guitar. A few things that you may pick up is is your posture, facial expressions, hand positions. Little things that can be improved over time to see how relaxed you are playing. The more “effortless” you look. *with the occasional guitar face” will make you appear more professional and better at playing guitar.

 

Challenging yourself with difficulty

Another way to actively work out if you are getting better at the guitar is by challenging yourself. This may be playing harder solos or more difficult songs. Whether it’s trickier strumming patterns or fingerpicking patterns. There are lots of ways to challenge yourself over time to know that you are improving.

 

The faster you can master a more difficult item, and play them more smoothly and effortlessly. You know that you are definitely improving.

 

Is your guitar knowledge improving?

A way to know if you are becoming a rounded musician is testing your music theory. Music theory is helpful for communicating your music. Whether you want to write down something, or wanting to communicate it to someone else. Or if you want to push the boundaries for your improvisation and songwriting rather than play the same things over and over again. Knowing music theory can help you with all those things.

 

Make sure the music theory you are learning is relative to your goal and what you want to do.

 

To work out if your music theory knowledge is improving, you can either test it on the guitar or on paper.

 

How fast can you write out your scale sequence on paper?

 

How quickly can you play certain chord progressions from seeing them on paper?

 

Can you figure out what chords are in certain keys?

 

You can write yourself little tests that are similar, and test yourself every three to six months to see how you have improved. You may have even learnt new things that you can add to the subsequence tests as well!

 

Is your guitar knowledge improving?

A way to know if you are becoming a rounded musician is testing your music theory. Music theory is helpful for communicating your music. Whether you want to write down something, or wanting to communicate it to someone else. Or if you want to push the boundaries for your improvisation and songwriting rather than play the same things over and over again. Knowing music theory can help you with all those things.

 

Make sure the music theory you are learning is relative to your goal and what you want to do.

 

To work out if your music theory knowledge is improving, you can either test it on the guitar or on paper.

 

How fast can you write out your scale sequence on paper?

 

How quickly can you play certain chord progressions from seeing them on paper?

 

Can you figure out what chords are in certain keys?

 

You can write yourself little tests that are similar, and test yourself every three to six months to see how you have improved. You may have even learnt new things that you can add to the subsequence tests as well!

 

How fast are you playing?

 

When you first start to learn to play the guitar, it can seem very slow. Your chord changes are slow; you can even play in time with a song. But after a while it gets easier.

 

When you improve on the guitar, you may find your speed hold you back from being able to play your favourite solos.

 

Being able to play fast, whether it’s getting your hands to move faster or your brain to think quicker. Is a very objective way to measure progress.

 

You can do this with a number items, such as measuring the speed it takes you to play through a certain riff, scale. Or even fingerpicking through a section of a song.

 

Again, measure things that are relevant to what you want to play on the guitar. Use a metronome to measure your speed, and keep a little note somewhere of the dates and what you played at what speed.

 

Don’t worry if you don’t progress on your speed every week. The progress on speed is very much dependent on technique, relaxation, and practise. And it will never be a straight line up!

 

Hope these few things help you to work out if you are improving on the guitar as a way to motivate yourself. Different people find motivation in different ways. This can be one way to do it.

 

You can even get a friend to join you if you enjoy friendly competition as well!

 

Most importantly, make sure you feel good doing it all! And use these are encouraging tools to help you improve your guitar playing!

 

About Author:

Darryl Powis is a guitar school owner and teacher from East London, England. Providing guitar lessons to adults and children, including beginners and advanced guitar players. Designed to help them achieve what they want on the guitar.


Sam
Sam

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.